Tribute to Eggs Florentine

Ingredients:

  • 1-oz slice of your favorite bread (I used a nice whole wheat)
  • 1/2-oz slice of Gouda cheese (or any other semi-robust, white cheese)
  • 2-3 very thin slices of tomato
  • 6-12 spinach leaves, slightly wilted (see notes below)
  • 1 poached egg (see notes below)
  • Optional: Salt & pepper

Instructions:

  • Toast the bread until it is medium-dark and crunchy.  (I put mine in a toaster oven for 4 minutes.  Your cook time will vary depending on the type of bread you’re using, whether you are using a toaster or a toaster oven, the wattage of your appliance, etc.  Use your eyes and your nose to assess the toast, and you should be fine.)
  • Once the bread is finished toasting, immediately lay the slice of Gouda cheese on it (so that the cheese can melt a bit as it absorbs some of the heat from the toast).
  • Layer on the paper-thin slices of tomato, then the just-slightly-wilted spinach leaves.  You want a thin layer of each ingredient.
  • Gently place the poached egg on top of the spinach layer.
  • Optional: Sprinkle a tiny bit of salt and pepper over the top of the egg.
  • Pierce the yolk of the egg, and eat immediately.

Makes 1 serving.

Nutritional information per serving (approximates – will depend a lot on the type of bread you use): 180 calories, 9.5 g fat, 12 g carbohydrate, 2 g fiber, 2.5 g sugar, 12 g protein.

The dish, as served.

The dish, just before eating.

My notes:

  • To wilt the spinach, I sprinkled the leaves with just a few drops of water, then microwaved them for a mere 15 seconds.
  • I learned how to poach an egg this weekend.  The step-by-step instructions I followed are loosely posted here.

The ratings:
Mental Cost (ingredient availability): Very low.
Financial Cost (ingredient cost): Again, very low.
Emotional Cost (cooking skill level): High.  No doubt about it.
Time Cost (recipe preparation): Lovely low.
Life Cost (clean up time/effort): Pretty low.
Worth It? (rate from 1-5): If you know how to poach an egg, I’d rate this recipe near a 4.  If you don’t know how to poach an egg, the recipe drops down to a 2.75.

The Bottom Line: Will I make this recipe again?

A few months ago I set a challenge for myself: To complete 101 tasks in 1001 days.  (Why?  You can read about my reasons here if you want.)  Number 91 on the list is “poach an egg” – which I did this weekend.

In preparation for my poaching attempt, I conducted online research (basically to learn everything from what a poached egg even is, to tips and suggestions on how to cook the little guy successfully…); and just a few clicks into my querying, I encountered both Eggs Benedict and Eggs Florentine.

Poaching the egg was all the culinary challenge I wanted to undertake this weekend, so I decided to skip making a hollandaise or mornay sauce, and instead channel the spirit of Eggs Florentine by creating this much simpler spin-off.  Just as a tribute band works to spread joy while fully recognizing it is not the same entity as the original band, so too does my humble little sandwich hope to give people a hint of the flavor of Eggs Florentine without the added stress of trying to perfect an emulsion technique.  Poaching the egg is difficult enough.

This creation will never be confused with an authentic Eggs Florentine dish; but for what it is (a simple, fast, light sandwich) it’s just fine.  For me, it was fun to learn how to poach the egg; getting to make a meal out of it is just a nice bonus.

Stef

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About Stef

A "serious" gal who is trying to remember to lighten up and smile.
This entry was posted in bread, breakfast, cheese, eggs, postaweek2011, spinach, tomatoes, vegetarian and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to Tribute to Eggs Florentine

  1. What a lovely sandwich! Congratulations on crossing something off your “to-do” list too! Great post, Stef!!

    Like

  2. carlaat says:

    Yum! Looks comforting and delicious! :)

    Like

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